Bruinformer

Fallout: New Vegas

https%3A%2F%2Fwww.gameskinny.com%2Fh1ylm%2F11-best-missions-in-fallout-new-vegas
https://www.gameskinny.com/h1ylm/11-best-missions-in-fallout-new-vegas

https://www.gameskinny.com/h1ylm/11-best-missions-in-fallout-new-vegas

https://www.gameskinny.com/h1ylm/11-best-missions-in-fallout-new-vegas

Ben Valentine, Writer/Polls

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Nearly a decade after its original release, Fallout New Vegas still manages to capture the attention of the fanbase. Even with the technologically superior, more polished Fallout 4 receiving lots of attention, many fans still look to the west. Nevada, to be exact. While Fallout 4 features a sprawling, beautiful landscape in the form of the Boston ruins, too many, it seems stretched too thin. Sure, the rolling grassy gnolls and overgrown skyscrapers are pretty to look at, but in the end, that’s about all they’re good for. 200 years after the apocalypse and Boston looks like it hasn’t recovered whatsoever. This is where 4 and New Vegas tend to differ.

The differences between the two latest games in the series become more apparent as we look back at their roots. During the early years of Fallout, Black Isle Studios had crafted a barren wasteland where society only manages to cling to life. The people of California are only just now gaining some footing. Cut to Fallout 2, where we see two civilized factions vying for power in a world still recovering from nuclear fallout. The game doesn’t focus on just trying to survive-it’s trying to rebuild. After their eventual failures and bankruptcy, the Fallout IP was sold to a well-established company called Bethesda. Bethesda has the reigns on the series, and with their new creative direction, comes a completely different world.

Cut to Fallout 3, a post-apocalyptic blend of role-playing game and first-person shooter. Longtime fans return to a new world in the ruins of the U.S. capital. Differing greatly from the games before it, the people of the wasteland seem to be just clinging to life, with no law and no government. The only two factions in this new wasteland are the previously reclusive Brotherhood of Steel and the long thought dead Enclave. The choices in this game still matter, and all in all, it was a pretty solid game. A massive departure from the original, but able to stand on its own right. Only a matter of years later, Bethesda wants another Fallout, but are wrapped up in their main series. After some debate, Bethesda hires another studio to develop their next game for them–Obsidian Entertainment. Obsidian was made up of various members who just so happened to be involved with the original games development. To longtime fans, this was a godsend. Despite being given limited time and resources, Obsidian manages to make a game that exceeded almost everyone’s expectations, especially considering it was made on an outdated engine. Fallout New Vegas was almost a return to form for the series. While keeping the gameplay from its predecessor relatively unchanged, New Vegas manages to improve on it in every way.

The shooting mechanics are refined, the story is more akin to the originals, and even the setting screams Black Isle. Despite an abundant amount of technical issues at its release, this return to form received a warm reception from fans. It showed that after 200 years, civilization could return to somewhat normality. While the threat of post-nuclear dangers were still everywhere, many people could prosper in the wastes. This time around, 3 factions are vying for total control. The New California Republic, formed before the events of Fallout 2, have expanded all the way into Nevada, and are struggling. Despite their good intentions of reuniting America and reforming society in its old ways, they’re stretched far too thin to do much good. In comes the Romanesque Caesar’s Legion, a barbaric legion made up of hundreds of tribes and ruled by an iron fist. Despite being ruthless and cruel, the Legion knows that the only way to reunify a chaotic world is through control. To counter these comes the enigmatic and mysterious Mr. House, a complicated pre-war billionaire and owner of an army of highly advanced robots. All three factions make their points, and while some can be considered more evil than other, they’re all in a moral gray ground. This is where New Vegas succeeds the most.

While Fallout 3 gives you one, clearly heroic choice of faction, New Vegas manages to craft a convincing assortment of post-apocalyptic factions. While the Legion can be considered wholly evil, maybe that ferocity is what a loosely tethered wasteland needs. And while choosing to fight for yourself may be selfish, maybe you don’t like any factions or government in an already flourishing community. I think New Vegas succeeds most in its story, which stays truer to its choice based roots than any other game in the series, and manages to convey a realistic and flawed society. No faction is perfect, and that’s what makes them perfect.

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Gaming

    Digimon: Dawn and Dusk

  • Fallout: New Vegas

    Gaming

    Sonic The Hedgehog Retrospective

  • Fallout: New Vegas

    Arts and Entertainment

    Fans are Outraged Because Microsoft Takes Legal Action Against Halo Online

  • Fallout: New Vegas

    Gaming

    Disgaea

  • Fallout: New Vegas

    Arts and Entertainment

    Summer Racing Comes to the Ground, Air, and Sea

  • Fallout: New Vegas

    Arts and Entertainment

    After Fifteen Years Beyond Good And Evil Gets A Sequel

  • Fallout: New Vegas

    Arts and Entertainment

    Fallout 3 Retrospective

  • Fallout: New Vegas

    Arts and Entertainment

    Dragonball FighterZ

  • Fallout: New Vegas

    Arts and Entertainment

    Spider-man Swings Back Into Gaming

  • Fallout: New Vegas

    Gaming

    Monster Hunter

The student news site of Blackford High School
Fallout: New Vegas